Blending the Power of ONTAP Cloud on AWS with VMware Cloud on AWS

DOUG CHAMBERLAIN | November 28, 2017

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You may wonder what NetApp is up to with our latest efforts with VMware and Amazon Web Services. Most of Netapp’s customers are well aware of our long partnership with VMware. We have many mutual customers who are using NetApp® storage behind their on-premises VMware environments. But we also know that our customers are looking to build hybrid cloud solutions that allow even more portability for their virtual applications and their data.

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ArpaWare

ArpaWare helps customers realize cost-effective, high capacity networking for modern data centers. Linux transformed the economics and innovation for data center compute, and now Open networking and OpenStack is doing the same for the network and cloud. It radically reduces the costs and complexities of operating modern data center networks for businesses of all sizes.

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Cloud Computing The disruptive shift to cloud for the long-term investor

Article | March 5, 2020

The public cloud services market is expected to total more than $214 billion when the figures for 2019 are finalised.The Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) segment of cloud is expected to have grown nearly 30% during 2019. If you haven’t heard of “IaaS”, that’s ok, just think of “Amazon Web Services” or “Microsoft Azure” as some of the biggest players in IaaS. In 2019, the U.S. Department of Defence even entered into a $10 billion contract with Microsoft Azure to move to the cloud, offering yet another proof point on the perceived convenience and security of using cloud-based infrastructure. In August of 2011, Marc Andreessen, a prominent Silicon Valley venture capitalist, wrote the phrase “software is eating the world” within a Wall Street Journal article[3]. Even then, now more than eight years ago, the case was clear that companies in Silicon Valley were relying less and less on delivering a physical “product” and more and more on delivering some type of software over the internet.

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How cloud companies are reacting to Covid-19 and services offered: AWS, Alibaba, and more

Article | March 24, 2020

As the Covid-19 pandemic continues, with citizens across many countries urged to work from home where possible, it has posed a unique challenge for both frontend applications and the backend technologies underpinning them.A lot of attention has, understandably, focused on the former. Zoom, which appears to be the videoconferencing tool du jour for many businesses, has held up well thus far, although at the time of print (March 23) some downtime issues in the UK have been detected. Similarly, outside of work, Netflix is lowering its video quality to keep up with demand. Yet underneath it all, cloud infrastructure providers are aiming to keep their systems online throughout the pandemic.Whether it is cloud software or infrastructure, many of the world’s leading companies are making their tools available for certain users primarily healthcare organisations or researchers working on Covid-19.

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In the Face of a Pandemic, Cyberattackers Seek to Take Advantage

Article | March 17, 2020

Cyberattackers live for moments of crisis and confusion. Government agencies and companies already stretched thin are at their most vulnerable, and cyberattackers are all too willing to apply overwhelming pressure to maliciously disrupt operations or gain some financial benefit. As the world struggles to address the mounting challenges of the pandemic, we have already seen early examples of this. For example, news broke this week that the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) had been hacked over the weekend.

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Is the cloud really safe

Article | April 15, 2020

Back in the day, the theft and loss of backup tapes and laptops were a primary cause of data breaches. That all changed when systems were redesigned and data at rest was encrypted on portable devicesNot only did we use technology to mitigate a predictable human problem, we also increased the tolerance of failure. A single lapse, such as leaving a laptop in a car, doesn’t have to compromise an organisation’s data. We need the same level of failure tolerance, with access controls and IT security, in the cloud.In the cloud, all infrastructure is virtualised and runs as software. Services and servers are not fixed but can shrink, grow, appear, disappear, and transform in the blink of an eye. Cloud services aren’t the same as those anchored on-premises. For example, AWS S3 buckets have characteristics of both file shares and web servers, but they are something else entirely.Practices differ too. You don’t patch cloud servers they are replaced with the new software versions. There is also a distinction between the credentials used by an operational instance (like a virtual computer), and those that are accessible by that instance (the services it can call).Cloud computing requires a distinct way of thinking about IT infrastructure.

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Spotlight

ArpaWare

ArpaWare helps customers realize cost-effective, high capacity networking for modern data centers. Linux transformed the economics and innovation for data center compute, and now Open networking and OpenStack is doing the same for the network and cloud. It radically reduces the costs and complexities of operating modern data center networks for businesses of all sizes.

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