Final Cloud Infographic

| June 1, 2017

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Cloud Computing refers to flexible, network accessible computing resource pools that can be allocated to meet demand. Broken down, what does that mean? Flexible - Your computing resources can be adjusted on-demand so you only use and pay for what your current demand requires. Network-Accessible - Your computing applications and services are housed and maintained in Telesystem’s Data Centers and accessed through the internet, instead of on-site at your location.

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Daisy Group

"Established in 2001, Daisy has grown its capabilities in line with the converging business communications and IT services markets. Our comprehensive product and service portfolio includes lines and calls, data connectivity, security, mobile, LAN and WiFi, hybrid cloud, IT managed services and business continuity. "

OTHER ARTICLES

Zoom, Microsoft cloud usage are rocketing during coronavirus pandemic, new data show

Article | March 30, 2020

New data points Monday bear out that digital tools like Zoom Video Communications Inc.’s teleconferencing software and Microsoft Corp.’s cloud-computing offering are seeing huge spikes in usage as the COVID-19 pandemic keeps workers housebound.Zoom ZM, -0.79% is thought to be a key beneficiary of the novel coronavirus outbreak, which has forced more employers to experiment with remote-work tools. Shares have surged roughly 50% in the past month on the expectation that businesses and schools are increasingly experimenting with the company’s videoconferencing tools and might even stick around as paying customers after the public-health crisis subsides.

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The cloud and rising to the challenge

Article | April 16, 2020

In a very short space of time, the coronavirus outbreak has completely transformed how organisations across all sectors operate. With lockdown restrictions rolling out across the globe, those organisations have moved quickly to instruct their staff to work from home in a bid to halt the spread of the Covid-19 infection.The nature of the IT industry will mean many of its businesses and employees will have remote working experience, but that isn’t the same across the board. According to March 2020 research from the Office of National Statistics (ONS), only 30% of UK employees ever worked from home during 2019. For many, the change has been sharp and abrupt, and brought with it significant challenges for both the workforce and the IT infrastructure required to support it.Due to the rapidly unfolding pace of the Covid-19 pandemic, CIOs have had little time to test the robustness of their business continuity strategy. However, the demands of the workforce will remain the same, with remote staff expecting the same resources and applications from home as they would if they were still operating out of a central office. Making sure that IT infrastructures can cope with the surge in demand for access to on-premise and cloud platforms from remote locations is key in the coming months.

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Cloud computing for small businesses Five reasons why it works

Article | March 16, 2020

Small and medium businesses (SMEs) play a significant role in the development and growth of the economy of any country. They are also a vital part of the global economy. To stay afloat in an increasingly interconnected and competitive global market, SMEs also need to adapt to the latest technology. SMEs that fail to do so will eventually have to close their doors.One of the most crucial technologies that SMEs must start using is cloud computing. It can help your business grow swiftly, lower infrastructure costs, and help drive innovation. According to a survey by Gartner, up to 60 per cent of organisations will use an external service provider’s cloud-managed service offerings by 2022, doubling the percentage of such organisations since 2018.

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AWS tags US$235 million to expand its cloud infrastructure in Latin America

Article | February 10, 2020

Amazon Web Services (AWS) is raising its stake on cloud computing infrastructure in Latin America. Proof of this is that the IT company will use R$1 billion (around US$235 million) to expand its data center in Sao Paulo. These millions will be used for its Data Processing Center located in that part of Brazil. In addition, a portion of these US$235 million will also be used to increase the services it offers to both public and private parties.The move gives reason to suggest that AWS is upping the ante in the future of startups and tech in the region that rely on cloud services to develop their own products.It launched its cloud center in Brazil in 2011 but it’ll be getting some beefing up thanks to these funds. Moreover, AWS has two Edge networks in São Paulo and two in Rio de Janeiro. As well as one in each of the following cities: Bogotá (Colombia), Buenos Aires (Argentina), and Santiago (Chile).The objective of all of this is to be the region’s prime provider of cloud infrastructure and beat out its competition AKA, Google Cloud Platform and Microsoft’s Azure.

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Spotlight

Daisy Group

"Established in 2001, Daisy has grown its capabilities in line with the converging business communications and IT services markets. Our comprehensive product and service portfolio includes lines and calls, data connectivity, security, mobile, LAN and WiFi, hybrid cloud, IT managed services and business continuity. "

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