One cloud accounting dilemma will soon be fixed

DAVID LINTHICUM | January 30, 2018

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You know cloud computing is here to stay when the accountants take notice. The Financial Accounting Standards Board’s Emerging Issues Task Force plans to propose new rules for how to deal with cloud computing service costs. The updated guidance means that a customer under contract with a cloud computing provider would consider the current processes of leveraging internal-use software to determine how to recognize implementation costs as an asset. Moreover, the new guidance recognizes that implementation costs are an asset that may be expensed over the terms of the contract with the cloud computing provider, as long as the arrangement is not terminated at the time of the contract.

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AppLabs

AppLabs offers a combination of consulting, outsourcing, offshore and specialist services across all types of software testing and quality management activity. AppLabs further strengthened its portfolio by investing in core intellectual property (IP) assets for test automation (e.g., Enterprise Test Automation Platform [eTAP™]), proprietary test methodology (SCORE Methodology™), and cloud solutions.

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