Public cloud performance: You don’t always get what you pay for

MICHELLE DAVIDSON | March 15, 2016

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When it comes to features, security and support from public cloud service providers (CSPs), there’s often a direct correlation between price and what is delivered. That isn’t the case with performance, according to research from Cloud Spectator.

Spotlight

PT. Sigma Cipta Caraka

Established in 1987, PT Sigma Cipta Caraka (later known as, telkomsigma) started its business as an IBM chosen partner to sell hardware to Indonesian local banks. In 1989, it developed its own core-banking system, called AlphaBITS, which accommodated the local bank requirements and was utilized by 35 mid-sized banks. Later in 1997, during the global economic hardship, to support the local banks requirements and to increase the banks’ IT investment efficiency, PT Sigma Cipta Caraka launched data center and outsourcing services.

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Spotlight

PT. Sigma Cipta Caraka

Established in 1987, PT Sigma Cipta Caraka (later known as, telkomsigma) started its business as an IBM chosen partner to sell hardware to Indonesian local banks. In 1989, it developed its own core-banking system, called AlphaBITS, which accommodated the local bank requirements and was utilized by 35 mid-sized banks. Later in 1997, during the global economic hardship, to support the local banks requirements and to increase the banks’ IT investment efficiency, PT Sigma Cipta Caraka launched data center and outsourcing services.

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